Charlie Russell’s Cowboys: Fashioning the Montana Male Body

By Birdie Kushner THE WHITE COWBOY cannot be ignored, as far as canonical symbols of mass American culture go. It was White Cowboy who drove American tourism, industrialization, tobacco industries, and high fashion to the rugged Montana landscape, even before the technological advent of western film or Marlboro cigarette commercials. Before the mass proliferation of … More Charlie Russell’s Cowboys: Fashioning the Montana Male Body

Tesla and Montana: Autonomous Cars on Montana’s Highways

By Adam Negri The first portion of highway commissioned by the legislative powers in Montana was a nine-mile stretch of paved concrete road connecting Butte to Anaconda in 1921. This marked the beginning of a long journey aimed at the eventual creation of the remarkable network of interstate highways that we see today in this … More Tesla and Montana: Autonomous Cars on Montana’s Highways

Review of Two Weeks Every Summer: Fresh Air Children and the Problem of Race in America by Tobin Miller Shearer

By Amanda Hardin The premise for historian Tobin Miller Shearer’s book, Two Weeks Every Summer: Fresh Air Children and the Problem of Race in America, began with a single photograph. As Shearer rifled through a Mennonite record room ten years ago in Pennsylvania, he discovered a peculiar image. In the photograph, a young African American … More Review of Two Weeks Every Summer: Fresh Air Children and the Problem of Race in America by Tobin Miller Shearer

A Winter in Moscow: Jim Meyer Returns from Fulbright

Professor Jim Meyer recently returned from a Fulbright to Moscow. His research focused on the life of Nazim Hikmet, a Turkish poet who was arrested, frequently imprisoned, and exiled for his pro-communist beliefs. Hikmet also traveled between the two countries often. Meyer spoke about his research and the Russian reaction (or lack thereof) to accusations … More A Winter in Moscow: Jim Meyer Returns from Fulbright

Reclaiming Indigenous Women’s History

  At the Rural Women’s Studies blog, Cynthia Prescott has posted a meditation on Anne Hyde’s Empires, Nations, Families. She rightfully lauds the book for creating a complex history of the way that individual families navigated changing imperial formations. She asks us, however, to read Hyde’s work as a call for historians to pay greater attention to the … More Reclaiming Indigenous Women’s History

The West as Sanctuary for the Historic African American Community?

by Crystal Alegria and Jill Falcon Mackin   The 1860s marked a shift in westward expansion to Montana Territory. What began as a trickle, became a rush and then a torrent as people from all over the United States and the world found cause to migrate. The discovery of gold and the promise of Indian land … More The West as Sanctuary for the Historic African American Community?

Why is there still so much public confusion about climate change?

  My dad has been a high school biology teacher for the last thirty years. He delights in educating his students about evolutionary theory by discussing the genetics of ear lobes, eye color, among other inheritable traits; he also enjoys helping them dissect small animals—mostly frogs and cats—in order to learn basic anatomy and physiology. … More Why is there still so much public confusion about climate change?